Credibility Builds Trust

I recently attended an exhibition that my eight-year old Victoria was in. She is taking gymnastics at a local college and the event was a combination of the little kids showing their skills and a highly professional show performed by the college students. I went to see Victoria and she was on stage for about three minutes and she did a great job. However, we didn’t leave when she finished and, thank goodness, stayed for the rest of the show—it was spectacular!

I’ve been fortunate to see Cirque du Soleil several times and these kids could easily move right into those shows and perform with the professionals. If you’ve ever seen a gymnastics performance you get where I am going with the idea of trust. Several times in the performance, the performers jumped into each other’s arms or climbed onto someone’s shoulders or other ways where they were depending on each other to catch them or hold them up.

I thought about how it must feel the first time you do something like that when you aren’t sure what is going to happen but you have to trust that it will work out ok. In life, we have to trust other people all the time. Children trust their parents and teachers. We put trust in our elected officials and we hope they will do the right thing (and we too often learn we were wrong!). We trust the important people in our lives to be there for us.

Trust is built on credibility. In our business lives, we don’t usually trust people without proof that they mean what they say or that they will do what they have promised. It may take us a long time to learn to trust a new manager or co-worker. We observe them in action to see if they keep their promises and live their values. Hopefully, once the trust is established, it lasts for the life of the relationship but trust can be destroyed much quicker than the time it took to build it in the first place.

Trust is a necessary building block for any successful relationship—be it professional or personal. How do you demonstrate trust to your employees or friends? Do you live your values? Do you keep your promises? Can people depend on you like the gymnasts do on each other—will you be there when they fall?


2 comments ()

1. James Karson wrote:
What about trust in American business, where it has become vogue for corporate CEOs to be outlandishly rewarded for cutting the costs/careers of 20+ year value add loyal associates who gave their trust and years of career equity to build corporate value for their shareholders, only to be methodically eliminated as expendable depreciated assets or the plight of today's Millennia's hopeless reality that job hopping every few years is the new norm in our global economy?

Trust in business and our global economic engine is the crucial foundation of a healthy, creative value added world community which should / can sustain all, not just those very few unregulated, ruthless individuals who have been given the latitude to do the right thing for all only to demonstrate their human base desires / anti-social behavior merely to satisfy the corporate bottom line at any (ends justifies the means) expense?

And what of the recruiters who have adopted the "Overqualified" response, (that has been sanctioned by their legal experts to avoid age discrimination litigation) to an entire wise and productive generation who have been displaced merely because of the "business efficiency quotient", is there not a latent betrayal of trust in this questionable, deceptive recruiting practice?

Is this really the business world that you want for your children and their children?

I for one am appalled at how quickly America's mutually beneficial employer - employee trust relationship has unilaterally deteriorated from the days when my father worked for the same company for 40 years until age 65 and then was equally/fairly rewarded for his lifelong contribution with a pension and health benefits for life.

Time to redefine the word, TRUST, in our 21st century society because our Internet Age children know how to Google its definition and its history,

James

June 10, 2014 @ 3:52 PM

2. James Karson wrote:
What about trust in American business, where it has become vogue for corporate CEOs to be outlandishly rewarded for cutting the costs/careers of 20+ year value add loyal associates who gave their trust and years of career equity to build corporate value for their shareholders, only to be methodically eliminated as expendable depreciated assets or the plight of today's Millennia's hopeless reality that job hopping every few years is the new norm in our global economy?

Trust in business and our global economic engine is the crucial foundation of a healthy, creative value added world community which should / can sustain all, not just those very few unregulated, ruthless individuals who have been given the latitude to do the right thing for all only to demonstrate their human base desires / anti-social behavior merely to satisfy the corporate bottom line at any (ends justifies the means) expense?

And what of the recruiters who have adopted the "Overqualified" response, (that has been sanctioned by their legal experts to avoid age discrimination litigation) to an entire wise and productive generation who have been displaced merely because of the "business efficiency quotient", is there not a latent betrayal of trust in this questionable, deceptive recruiting practice?

Is this really the business world that you want for your children and their children?

I for one am appalled at how quickly America's mutually beneficial employer - employee trust relationship has unilaterally deteriorated from the days when my father worked for the same company for 40 years until age 65 and then was equally/fairly rewarded for his lifelong contribution with a pension and health benefits for life.

Time to redefine the word, TRUST, in our 21st century society because our Internet Age children know how to Google its definition and its history,

James

June 10, 2014 @ 3:52 PM

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